Purple Haze

Most people think of autumn in terms of oranges and yellows, but before that, and just after summer has dipped away, there is a time in September that is just ‘purple’. Now, of course purple has been very much at the forefront for much of this spring and summer as it was the primary colour chosen by Richard’s niece for her wedding, so we were planting and painting in a lot of those shades.  But the morning glories didn’t choose to bloom until this month (and before the frost last week they were in tremendous glory indeed, and not just in the morning!)  And the hills have had a purple haze on them most mornings and evenings, with much mist and fog and drifting smoke from those choosing to already start heating their homes (we haven’t).

But September is NOT a time to settle and relax yet, in fact it is THE busiest month of all months on the farm – even worse than late May-mid-June when all the planting and watering is being done. Harvest has always been a ‘crazy’ time, what with picking and pickling, processing, carrying, cooking and canning, foraging and freezing.  The only one who slows down a bit in September is Simba. Well, not that Simba (old and fat) EVER does anything in a hurry, but the cooler days means we don’t force him out the door at 7 a.m. now, or really at all. So he’s back in happy-mode (he doesn’t really like outside!)  Thus, for only one of us, there is time to stretch a dainty ballet-dancer’s paw and rest easy.

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Simba in September

Considering the morning glories were all planted in early June for blooming by late July’s wedding, it is shocking that they took this long to show themselves. They are supposed to be one of the fastest-growing climbing plants – but here they are now, along with some scarlet runner beans which also grow quickly and were meant to cover all our birch arches in time for the ceremony.

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purple everywhere!
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sit a spell!
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morning and the glories

Richard is excited because he FINALLY got to find the first egg laid by one of our original Buff Orpingtons. We THINK it’s C.C. (cuddly chick) but they are hard to tell apart anymore, and C.C. isn’t as friendly as she used to be… Of course, as in the last blog entry, Lucy was our substitute and she came laying for us already, but now we are finally getting 2 eggs a day and I can breathe a little easier knowing that baking time (which really slows down during harvest as there’s so much else to do in the kitchen)  through the winter will have a reliable supply without anyone having to make a trip to the chicken farm!

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doesn’t take much to excite Richard these days!

 

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Lucy the Layer (left) is joined by the two NON-laying Buff Orpingtons (the other one is on the nest in the barn doing her best to pop one out!)   But these two girls need to get going as well!

Speaking of chickens, Richard is building a greenhouse out of recycled windows from various neighbours, (next blog!) and he can’t MOVE for stumbling over a bird.  Boy, dig up a little earth and do they come running!  (That bluish-purple flower is the Borage – gone MAD this year, but it’s so great for attracting the bees; it’s their very favourite of anything on the property and it lasts from June through to even after the first frost or two!)

 

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Lucy the Layer:  “Find me some WORMS, dude!”

 

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Our egg-bowl on the table (you don’t have to refrigerate eggs if they haven’t been cleaned or refrigerated priorly) and our favourite snack, introduced to us last year by our cousin Linda – delicious lovely GROUND CHERRIES!

Our edamame didn’t get as big this year as the other two years ; the weather makes so much difference to everything and while most veg did BETTER this year, and we were over-flowing in squash and cucumber and tomatoes (and beans, always bloody BEANS!) the edamame which is one of our favourite snacks too, just didn’t do as well. But we still have enjoyed them AND frozen some (steamed a bit first, then dried!).  Best way to eat them though, is as the Japanese do it – steamed lightly, salted heavily, and popped into your mouth right from the pod! Highly suggest if you haven’t before that you try both ground cherries (you don’t do anything to them, just open the paper lantern and eat the sweet YELLOW fruit!)  and edamame.

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steamed edamame ready for snacking

garden 2018

Above and below are photos taken of the garden in the mist one morning, by guest Mary Walker. She and Dave came by again this autumn on their way through the Maritimes with their big R.V.  The purply borage can be seen above on either side of the garden in a haze of blurred colour and below, among the corn, amarynth and herbs (which I’ve been both hanging and drying in the oven for use over the winter) A note on sunflowers – I thought I planted the right kind this year – the kind of seeds we can eat for snacking.  The chickens like them, but they aren’t the human kind, so trial 3 was a bust on those again!

garden 2018,mary

Another plant I’ve been introduced to this year is kohl rabi.  We aren’t really cabbage-eating people here, and it’s very hard to grow anyway, but Pierrette, who has lived here her whole life suggested the kohl rabi. Fist-sized when ready for picking, it’s cabbage-like, but a bit more parsnip-tasting and I invented (due to what was ripe at the time) a great pureed soup with fennel leaves, kohl rabi and whey from all the cheese-making I’ve been doing. The other pureed soups I have made up and frozen are zucchini and fennel and cucumber and whey.  Best served cold with dollops of Cammie’s yogurt in the centre like sour cream. Yum!

mary, milk, kohl rabi

Kohl Rabi (above in basket) ready for a batch of soup to be made up, with quarts of goat milk in the foreground ready for our favourite cheese – the herb-rolled chevre.  I’ve also had some success (in texture and quantity, but not TASTE yet) with feta and mozzarella. Thanks to Mary Walker for the photo!

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Mom and Mary off for a morning walk in the September sunshine

Cammie can be SOOOO naughty!  When she’s loose she isn’t just foraging the flowers and plants we don’t want her eating, BUT when we notice Smitty sitting really close to our kitchen door, it’s because that darn goat has come on the porch and virtually kicked Smitty off his sleeping bag bed so SHE can lie on it~!

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Cammie on dog-bed

She doesn’t even act guilty when you go out and shout at her to get off!

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“Bad Cammie !”

Purple Haze on the mountains close out most of our September days, although the oranges and yellows are starting now and will be featured in the next few posts, which will include the building of the greenhouse, plus a plethora of  scarecrows, and murders of crows, and Thanksgiving and pumpkins and straw-bales…

 

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PURPLE HAZE, 7:00 p.m.
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August – Farm Foto-Fest!

If you didn’t see last week’s posting Straight From The Horse’s Mouth, it’s in a different section of this blog as it’s primarily for interested equestrians here: bluebellmountainblog.wordpress.com/straight-from-the-horses-mouth/

In this particular posting, you’ll find the goings on ‘down home on the farm’ OTHER than the busy time with the Straights (chronicled above)  since the beginning of August.  Such as Smitty gets to spend a lot more time off his chain because he mostly sticks around now AND doesn’t bite the first people that might drive in the driveway (like the carload of Jehovah’s Witnesses that rolled in today) AND he doesn’t chase the other animals anymore.  Thus he has become something of a Pied Piper!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

For most of the latter part of this summer, since the first rains came at the end of July and our garden became a veritable JUNGLE, my kitchen has looked like this and worse most days: baking out, some form of dairy being made from Cammie’s milk (2 quarts a day now!) The below is my Chevre cheese which is quick and I’m getting better at it now – it’s much less crumbly and stays in a mold now than when this was taken. PLUS at least 3 or 4 types of vegetables sitting about waiting for “processing” of some stage or other.

 

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Though we’re always exhausted this time of year, it IS so rewarding to partake in meals or snacks (if we ever find the time to sit down for one!) that are completely and totally from our own garden or animals. The following photo shows me drinking my made-from-scratch iced tea with mint and borage, and eating my homemade bread slathered with Cammie’s butter and chevre (made with herbs from my herb garden like fennel which we are LOVING this year!) , and homemade raspberry jam (we picked these as last year down in the valley on a logging road neighbour Pierrette discovered. I wish we had time to pick more than we do, but we’re just so crazy busy getting the garden in and processed! )

 

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One of the young hens (still not laying!) we got in June came to my kitchen window, looked in and crowed loudly at me – so back HE went to the chicken farm and instead Richard brought home “Lucy the Layer”, who IS giving us an egg a day at least. Hopefully those other 3 will get the idea from her soon!

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Lucy:

lucy

And while I’ve been making chevre cheese and yogurt – even frozen yogurt once – regularly from all Cammie’s delicious thick milk, I’ve been slowly collecting the tiny bit of fat that rises to the top of the jars if you let them sit a few days.  Then I freeze it. So after more than a month, we took the jar out and thawed it, then shook the jar for 10 minutes and voila – Cammie-butter too! Now to find some Rennet tablets to make other kinds of cheeses – but not until the garden is all in, methinks!

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Mom helped so much early on with keeping the weeds down, but she won’t always partake of enough of the ‘fruits of our labours’, so I try to make her some dishes to enjoy before I freeze things like the soups and stews.  Have a great parsnip and fennel soup with the whey from the cheese and yogurt-making that I invented myself – delish!  Every single thing on this tray incl. the herbs and spices comes from Blue Belldon Farm!

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May, June and July were serious drought months, but since the wedding July 28th we’ve had some regular storms and other types of crazy weather.  Very photo-worthy:

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And of course all this rain has turned our garden into such mass-producing veg – and flowers and herbs too, for us and for the bees! – that we actually had to give some cucumbers to the local Food Bank this week – Mom and I have both made varying sorts of pickles ’til we can’t stand it anymore, plus I’ve pureed and frozen so much cucumber soup (delightful with Cammie-yogurt when served cold!) not to mention all the peas, beans, tomatoes, zucchini and squash we have in abundance right now!  Let’s not even talk about the carrots, edamame, parsnips and corn that I’m hoping will wait for me to catch up …

 

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My oven can handle 6 spaghetti squash (split in two) for cooking, then I drag all the ‘noodles’ out and freeze so that whenever we don’t want some heavy pasta dish, but do feel like something like it – we pull those containers out, thaw and melt some cheese or pour butter/salt or a sauce over.

 

 

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If you haven’t tried spaghetti squash, do so! It’s delicious, not fattening like noodles and actually quite fun to handle and “play” with!

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Now, also in August, SOME of the wedding photos from official photographer Tiffany Christensen have been ‘released’ as a teaser. So Richard’s niece Carriann gave me permission to share some of these, and there will likely be more forthcoming later on. Here’s the lovely bride and her father, Richard’s younger brother Jean-Marc (John), coming off our side porch and through our temporary arch (from a piece of wood Richard and I found in the woods in early spring and set up and painted white for just this purpose.  It looked much better all decorated than it does on a day-to-day basis!)

bride and father

Groom Matthieu and Bride Carriann exchange vows in front of the beautiful vista of which they had long envisioned and dreamed…bride and groom, cl-up

Tiffany was good enough to use as a backdrop for several shots, my Rustic Revivals’ cabin which Richard worked so hard on all through June and early July. I had purposely added some purple accents just for this big moment!

bride, bridesmaids

Tiffany has a great sense of humour with her photos, and was happy to have “crime boss” Matt and his mob do some godfather-esque poses:

crime boss groom

One of the surprises we’d wanted to offer Carriann and Matt was using our knoll in the bottom pasture as a “Hobbit Hole”. The couple are Tolkien fans in a big way, and if they could have afforded it, they’d have been off to New Zealand for their honeymoon to visit a lot of the Lord of the Ring sites, etc. But I painted a door and window and Richard artistically arranged them, then Tiffany REALLY went creative-crazy and got a really neat angle:

bride, groom, hobbit hole

We haven’t seen TOO many of the service yet, but Tiffany did share one of the Halpines – 3 boys and their Dad, who played some lovely classical and pop music throughout the ceremony. They also live self-sufficiently on a farm down the road from us, but are doing it in a much bigger way – besides their 5 young children, they have several goats to milk, a number of cows and pigs, ponies, donkeys, horses, many fowl and a fish pond!

halpines at wed

Thought this was a nice shot of Tiffany and Carriann together discussing some shots to take just after the service ended, back on our side porch.

for Tiffany

And here’s one of the entire guest-list. Richard and I are the 2nd couple from the left; I’m just raising my cowboy hat in the air.

full group, wedding

Though they didn’t want to actually touch the animals and get their clothes smelly and dirty before their reception, Carriann DID want some of the animals in their shots.  Tiffany is amazing at photo-shopping, too, apparently – because Richard was actually HOLDING Robin on a rope in this one, hiding behind Carriann’s skirt as best he could – and Tiff managed to make it all look free and natural!

robin in wedding

Speaking of dear Robin, we had some sad partings with the twins in the beginning of August as well. Kids should be weaned at about two months, and as we had found good homes for both, it was time to let them go, and get on with serious milking twice a day for our own larder (since this was the whole purpose of having to breed Cammie in the first place!) As Robin was the most friendly and out-going because of the early-on bonding with me (remember, he’s the twin who nearly died in the first few hours when I was alone with them and had to syringe some milk into him because he wouldn’t take to the teat right away) he was the first to go, and thus had a little photo journal taken of him as he learned to be weaned and to explore and eat various things on his own. As the wedding was over, I even let him experiment with nibbling flowers – anything to get him off milk!

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He was so cute as he had to learn to drink water, too – he tried the chicken’s shallow water pan outside…

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He followed Richard around when water was being carried to the other animals:OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And finally he took some tentative sips from the ‘big-boy’ pail!

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But he took to leaf-eating VERY easily and loved trying all new things and even standing on his hind legs to eat the apple tree leaves like his Mom!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Such a personable little guy, so unlike his twin “Mo” ! Robin was always following us around, fairly unperturbed that his brother and mother were shut up in the barn calling to him!

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We were a bit sad to see him go, but “Grace” is the type of gal that brings all her animals into her house for play-time, so we knew he’d be well-loved. (Mo took a lot longer to wean, and was with us for a very trying and noisy 10 more days before we could give him to the fellow who lives just 2 houses down the valley from us. But Mo is happy now too, with some other fowl and goat pals, and Richard says he’s even had some climbing apparatus and an upper level bunk to climb into at night!)

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And Grace sends us regular photos of Robin with her goat Rammi and matching pony, so we know he’s also very content and having lots of fun!

 

Also – this just in – Our New Denmark episode of Still Standing (Chevy and me in the parade shots) .  https://watch.cbc.ca/media/%E2%80%A6/s%E2%80%A6/new-denmark-nb/38e815a-00f0c4c14f4       Here’s a photo of Jonny Harris shaking hands with Trampis, our local ‘hippi’, who took Mo and lives just a few houses downhill…

jonny and trampis

 

 

But, Robin – you were very DEERE to us:

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And “Owl” Always Remember You!!!!

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