Finally!

But if you wonder why we’ve been so busy (never mind the milking, the garden, the canning/preserving) see Part One of the special post elsewhere on this blog and keep tuned because in a few days some farm-life and wedding-time photos will be up as well!    https://bluebellmountainblog.wordpress.com/straight-from-the-horses-mouth/

Advertisements

Keepin’ Cool in the Kitchen (and a few other Capers)

Yes, we HAVE had the big day – that is, the wedding here at Blue Belldon Farm of Richard’s niece Carriann.  However, that’s not what this blog post is going to be about yet.   Sorry, y’all. I decided with the many heat waves and high humidity, though, to wait until official wedding photographer, Tiffany Christensen of New Denmark, posts her glorious shots.  I will put up a photo or two near the end to show some of the flowers and fountains, though…

In the meantime, how do you keep cool in a record-breaking summer in New Brunswick, with humidity the likes of which this province has never seen?  (Thanks, climate change and all our centuries of fooling with Mother Nature. She is NOT happy!)  Most people here, rurally at least, do NOT have nor wish to have air-conditioning.  btw, that’s the same in England and many European countries. We are the greedy ones who keep taking and taking and by doing so, actually making the environmental changes WORSE YET.  World-wide, this has been an eye-opener for some this summer (not everyone of course, or even the ones who matter, who can DO something about it!)

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6859588/deadly-wildfires-and-killer-heatwaves-are-ripping-through-the-planet-from-athens-and-sweden-to-los-angles-and-japan/

One way of keeping cool is making lemonade or iced tea – from scratch as I do for beverages – into frozen pops in the freezer.  I also do this on the rare occasions we buy blueberry or cranberry juice.  When I’m just making up a pitcher of the beverage, I always stick a few leaves of mint in and put it in the fridge for a few hours. Then I put the glasses in the freezer, and ALWAYS serve with ice cubes!  I now make all the iced tea or lemonade with Stevia which, while crazily expensive, is helping the bees a bit as this has been a difficult season for them and honey thus far!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Another favourite way of keeping cool is sucking back my grandmother’s “Florida Ice”. Admittedly, while this is a homemade sherbet-type dessert, it is hardly a ”living self-sufficiently” recipe as it calls for a banana and orange juice and lemons.  I can barely manage a full-size cucumber in N.B. Pretty sure I won’t be growing any citrus fruits!  We DID however use Cammie’s goat milk the last time we made it, though, and that was delicious and made it feel a bit more ‘our own’.  I wonder what Grandma would have thought fifty years ago if she knew I was yanking on a goat’s teat in order to determinedly produce her special treat.

Here’s Grandma J.’s recipe. My sister and I have been eating this since we were toddlers, so start your own tradition of it in YOUR family!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I usually collect and freeze old mushy bananas and instead of making banana bread or muffins in the summer, this is what I make with them.  Richard eats a banana every morning but refuses to touch it if it has more than 3.5 black spots on it. Here we are measuring Cammie’s milk – it’s exciting now that she’s FINALLY giving a bit more for us (not without a big fuss on the part of both her and the twins, mind you!).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here I’m adding the sugar and putting it in the freezer to get semi-solid.  Grandma always used a bread pan, so that’s what we all do as well.  Keeps it deep, easier to cut, but hey – you find your own bowl or pan or container!

After an hour or so, I break in bits of the banana, do the lemon and orange juice and once in a while I’ve tried pineapple chunks too. A bit of coconut flavouring might really add to that!

Then I mush it all up (no big chunks!), freeze it solid for a few more hours, and, as Grandma did, cut it in slices which can then be cut up prior to serving, or just serve a ‘slab’ and let your happy taster break it up. Yum!

On the topic of Cammie and her milk, I have had successful attempts at making quick goat cheese with lemon juice. (see last blog post)  It was with great pleasure that I served this up for dinner last week:  Everything you see on the plate was from Blue Belldon but for the pasta, and I’ve no plans to start making THAT!

My attempt at yogurt – which I used to make in my early 20s in the oven overnight, did NOT work, but I’m sure it’s because my slow-cooker crock pot is too high, even on ‘LOW’. (We of course purchased the thing 2nd hand).  Thus tomorrow, I try it on the stove-top and see if THAT way works!  However, the crock-pot method, IF you want to make yogurt – esp. healthy goat’s milk  (if you have your own goat or can purchase it locally) is simple:

Use slightly older milk that’s been in the fridge for a few days (I’m also experimenting with making butter – you just take the cream from each jar and drizzle it into another one you’re freezing. Then, when you’ve enough, do the ‘shake-the-jar’ thing for ages, and apparently you’ll have made butter.  More on this when I’ve tried it!)

Warm it for several hours, add the ‘good bacteria’, usually from another batch of yoghurt.  Let it cool down VERY slowly – wrapped in blankets, etc. About 8 hours is necessary for this!  Then refrigerate and presto!  Only it wasn’t ‘presto’ for me because of it heating up too quickly.  There are lots of slow-cooker recipes online for this so find the one that works best for you. If you have a proper crock pot that works on LOW, this seems very easy and is also another way of keeping your Kitchen COOL in hot weather, as you’re using neither the stove-top nor the oven…

On a hotter note, we had sooooo much trouble getting the neighbours who cut and baled our hay for us last year to commit.  They wouldn’t just say ‘no’, but they also stopped answering our calls or returning messages left.  With the wedding coming up and a bit of rain in the forecast (finally!) we HAD to get it off the fields, so we begged another neighbour who really didn’t want to take the time, but he finally did bless him.  He baled it better than last year’s as well and Richard, Zeb and I brought it all into the barn on the Saturday exactly one week before the big day!

I love these shots – Richard surveying his land, with a chicken snoozing in the shade from the heavy heat even at 6:40 p.m.

 

Here’s some more shots of flowers (prepping for the wedding, and we FINALLY splurged and bought a proper fountain!) birds wanting in for a respite from the heat and Richard out for an evening hack or spending time with the livestock at dusk…