Full Bean Ahead – Waste Not, Want Not!

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Looking out my kitchen window toward the garden and meadows. July 2016. We’re keeping all beautiful cob and spiderwebs up this summer to see if it helps keep fly population DOWN in the house!  Besides, they are part of nature AND they are lovely!

Finally getting back to regular blogging after the interruption of a wordpress (this blog server) virus and some strange flu attacking my laptop as well. Joy and Richard arrived 10 days ago, and I just got R. to help me with the internet/laptop problems so I can write and post again.  People who know R. thinks he’s retired as of end of July.  Apparently, so did he – though I did warn him.  The garden is just starting to come in and if we want to live at ALL self-sufficiently for this year, it’s time to get cracking.  I’ve been baking and cooking double time in the kitchen to get back into doing regular meals again (rather than just picking at things for myself). Baking bread and muffins every 2nd or 3rd day.  But Richard, who has slept in most days, read a thick novel since arriving AND spent an entire day washing his ’73 Nova and driving it with the neighbour’s son to a classic car meet is going to take a little time to get his head wrapped around the idea that we have to WORK to LIVE here on the farm.  It’s coming along the last few days – but last Friday he was NOT full of beans like the garden. In fact, THIS is what things looked like from his perspective:

rich retireGlad we have no T.V., because with falling into bed exhausted, or reading, or playing our brain games (most from BBC youtube stashes) we are doing JUST fine.  Thought R. would kick up more of a fuss about this aspect, and maybe in the winter he will, but we’re good for now.

And it’s hard to train someone who has always bought whatever he feels like eating, that we are only snacking if we go to a little trouble at home to make it.  Like popcorn at night.  And I don’t mean MICROWAVED.  We’re making it the good old-f. way on the stove-top.  Richard learned how and is quite proud now to offer it up for our night-time munchies .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Retirement mode did not take long at ALL to kick in, but at least he’s learning how to make our own snacks, rather than spending money on store-bought crap!

 

Another difficulty has been getting this yuppie to stop wasting things when he mows or weed-eats.  We live on a FARM. There are many more important things to do around here than whipper-snip right to the foundation of the house, and all around the barn, and around every darn TREE on the property!  Especially since he also took out a beautiful English ivy I’d been nurturing along for two months, training to climb our front porch pillars! AND wasted at least 30 apples from our orchard driving around and around bashing into the low-hanging branches, knocking the not-yet-ripe apples off, then driving over them again with the mower! Grrrrrrrrrrr…. It will take time for this life-style change to come to him, I know.  He’s still making several trips to town and around the valley when I have categorically stated that unless there’s a medical emergency we go ONCE per week – with a big list! It will take time…

While R. is not exactly full of beans, Joy (Mom) and the garden ARE. She’s single-handedly unpacked and decorated the whole of the upstairs in just 10 days, and is now up there peeling 1970s indoor/outdoor carpet off some of the hall-way’s hard-wood floors. And the garden is just over-flowing with beans of 3 varieties.  I bought a lot of the runner/climbing type of seeds because I wanted to spread them around various trellises and poles on the farm for beauty’s sake as well.  We are at least a month behind Ontario for what is ripe and ready, but we are already picking peas, and when these beans come in, we’re going to be BUSY!   And by then, I know R. will be full of beans as well!

 

If interested, these are the health benefits of green, organic beans, from the tree-hugger website mentioned previously:

Health benefits of Green beans

  • Fresh green beans are very low in calories (31 caloriess per 100 g of raw bean pods) and contain no saturated fat. Nevertheless, these lean pod vegetables are a very good source of vitamins, minerals, and plant derived micronutrients.
  • The beans are very rich source of dietary fiber (9% per 100g RDA) which acts as a bulk laxative. Fiber helps to protect mucousa in the colon by decreasing its exposure time to toxic substances as well as by binding to cancer-causing chemicals in the gut. Adequate amount of fiber has also been shown to reduce blood cholesterol levels by decreasing reabsorption of cholesterol-binding bile acids in the colon.
  • Green beans contain excellent levels of vitamin A, and health promoting flavonoid poly phenolic antioxidants such as lutein, zea-xanthin and ß-carotene in good amounts. These compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a role in aging and various disease processes.
  • Zea-xanthin, an important dietary carotenoid in the beans, selectively absorbed into the retinal macula lutea in the eyes where it thought to provide antioxidant and protective UV-light filtering functions. It is, therefore, green beans offer some protection in the prevention of age-related macular disease (ARMD) in the elderly.
  • Snap beans are a good source of folates. 100 g fresh beans provide 37 µg or 9% of folates. Folate along with vitamin B-12 is one of the essential components of DNA synthesis and cell division. Good folate diet when given during preconception periods and during pregnancy may help prevent neural-tube defects in the newborn babies.
  • They also carry good amounts of vitamin-B6 (pyridoxine), thiamin (vitamin B-1), and vitamin-C. Consumption of foods rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful oxygen-free radicals.
  • In addition, beans contain healthy amounts of minerals like iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and potassium, which are very essential for body metabolism. Manganese is a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase, which is a very powerful free radical scavenger. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure.

 

 

Advertisements