There Once Was a Farmer…

there once was a

There once was a farmer who took a young miss
In back of the barn where he gave her a . . . .
Lecture on horses and chickens and eggs,
And told her that she had such beautiful . . . .
Manners that suited a girl of her charms,
A girl that he wanted to take in his . . . .
Washing and ironing and then, if she did,
They could get married and raise lots of . . . .

Chorus:
Sweet violets, sweeter than the roses,
Covered all over from head to toe,
Covered all over with sweet violets.

“Sweet Violets” is a classic example of a censored rhyme, where the expected-rhyme of each couplet is replaced with an unexpected word which segues into the next couplet or chorus. Numerous folk versions exist in which the implied lyrics are considerably more risqué than this first verse.  I have written a second verse, from a more emancipated female’s perspective,  that keeps it as amusingly innocent as the above, which we used to sing ’round the piano while my mother played for us as children. Here’s the second verse:

But when the young miss was near middle-age, She thought that she’d rather break out from her…

Husband’s iron fist and his constant request, For her to work harder without any…

Chances to say that the farm was well-kept, She wished into marriage she never had…

(repeat chorus)

This week, the neighbours’ chickens got into our compost and leaf pile, and I’m sure adding their own special droppings can only make the heap richer for the betterment of the garden.  When the turkeys came over last week, though, I had my doubts about their contribution! Silly things!

By the way, just look at the difference in green from one week to the next! Mother Nature is truly amazing in any season, but in the beginning of spring, we surely notice HER wealth of gifts to us!

Let’s think about EARTH this week of Earth Day, and how we mustn’t mistreat or abuse Her like the farmer with his darling “young miss”.  Let’s make sure She, Mother Earth,  knows we appreciate Her, and not just think of Her as a beautiful ‘trophy wife’, there to be taken advantage of at ‘man’s’ every whim…

 

 

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