Artist in the Attic, #1-ladies read to end, there’s a special treat there for y’all!

artist in attic painting

Having personally hand-picked and invited  over 100 artists to take part in both the annual Carlisle Country Craft and Old-fashioned Market Mercantile as well as the Rural Creators’ Collective (the 1st and premiere Artists in the Attic!) I feel as though I want to keep up the momentum of promoting others who have a passion for the rural traditions and spirit of our ancestors as I do…

yvonnessepia

Today I am blogging about Carlisle, Ontario’s own Yvonne Parsons, as she was one of the first artists on site at the festival (offering not only her own nature works, area barns, churches, etc. and pet portraits) but also took and developed sepia shots of good folk in their pioneer or steampunk dress. Several of these photos are already in this blog, in various collections of images of Richard, Joy or myself.  Here are some more just delightful ones of Ontario families enjoying the rural pioneer offerings; just click on each to expand it. (P.S., the pig’s name is Kevin Bacon, and is part of the wonderful  Auburn Acres- a multi-generational farm family who live self-sufficiently. See their fabulous website! http://www.auburnacresfarm.com/ ) :

Yvonne also assisted in running the shop upstairs, and took part in several portrait sittings for holidays such as Valentines (in conjunction with my own rustic and shabby chic wedding planning) and Easter/Christmas. Here is a sample of each of these type of portraits:

A few funny stories about the above sessions. In the bridal/boudoir shots for Valentines, Yvonne was startled when an elderly woman of nearing 70 (not pictured – that’s our friend Linda Simone!) had several shots done in a tight dress for her husband, then stripped that off to reveal lingerie that left NOTHING to the imagination. Pretty sure the panties were even of the sugary edible type.  Professional that she is, Yvonne kept a straight face and snapped away as per the customer’s request.  With the Easter shots, I think we both spent more time looking for the bunny behind the straw bales because the children had come near to squeezing the life out of the poor thing and it kept leaping away! Also, one little girl whose hair had been primped and curled to within an inch of her BEST behaviour evaporating,  was holding a giant lollipop for the shot – and promptly got it stuck in her tendrils.  Believe the mother had to actually cut a chunk out so that Yvonne could continue shooting… Awwww, what artists have gone through throughout the centuries to achieve their art!

Yvonne’s links to view her photos are on FB:https://www.facebook.com/YvonneParsonsPhotography

selling online, on Etsy, as many of us do:

https://www.etsy.com/ca/shop/CYStudios

and of course, her own lovely website:

http://yvonneparsonsphotography.zenfolio.com/f860813030

Some samples of rural work I admire are here:

Yvonne is originally from the Maritimes, as in fact are many of the artists I will be featuring in this blog.  So those of you living locally out here in the east will recognize some of her scenes such as this:

y1

Yvonne and her husband Todd also own a lovely farm, and have recently gotten heavily into animal husbandry.  It’s a lovely rural place on one of the few big hills in that part of Southern Ontario, and the other day this AMAZING photo of their farm was posted on Facebook… gorgeous shot, one every photographer strives to get once in a lifetime.  IRONICALLY, IT WAS TODD WHO SNAPPED IT!  Ahhhh, such is life! My mother, Joy, once took a similar shot in Slovenia – she NAILED it! And she’s the one who used to swing the camera off her glasses’ lenses and end up cutting the subject right out of the shot!

todd's

Lastly, as I’m trying to gain more followers, and many will likely be women (come on, the only posts you  men will be looking at are Pippi’s Fishin’ Hole Fables and Facts, and an occasional Rural Update on the state of rising cost of farm insurance…) I’m posting this stunning one of Yvonne’s… a model posing for one of her courses.  Still, in his plaid shirt he could pass for a rural lad, right? y5

 

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